CHRONIC FATIGUE

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome affects more than 1/2 million Canadians

  • No diagnostic tool exists

  • Natural Health offers relief


If not you, you know someone who is struggling every day. Depressive mood, brain fog, low energy and malaise. These are all unbelievably common symptoms that point to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS).


The good news is that you have many natural ways to reverse this.



The conventional medical system has an interesting strategy of categorizing diseases in which it does not understand.


In Canada, these diseases are called Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS). Usually the diseases that have a complex, whole-body root cause.


Conventional medicine has a reductionist perspective on disease and diagnostics.


Chronic fatigue syndrome belongs to this MUPS category. It's a complex long-term disorder.

In 2014, 5.5% of Canadians aged 25 and over had CFS, and women are more than twice as likely as men to report it (1).


Some statistics suggest that up to 90% of people suffering from CFS are undiagnosed. 1 in 4 CFS patients are either bed or homebound for long periods and find it difficult to perform normal activities (2).


We do not have an accurate diagnostic tool for CFS, for which there are many reasons.


Zero diagnostic methods, lack of awareness, and uneducated healthcare providers, to name a few (3).


Current research suggests an autoimmune dysregulation connection.





Many unexplained diseases can be associated with the immune system and gut health.


What can you do?


Without a known cause or cure, you have natural options for chronic fatigue syndrome.

Let's explore some of those.



PROBIOTICS


Fermented foods and probiotic supplements are everywhere in the health industry, and rightly so. They support the immune system and protect the digestive tract, which is the root of so many diseases, especially autoimmune diseases. Beyond the gut health potential of probiotics, research also points to the ability of probiotics to improve and boost mood.


The introduction of certain bacterial strains has been shown to reduce anxiety levels and inflammatory markers (4).


These studies used Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium infantis for an eight-week period.


Even improved neurological function was observed in people suffering from CFS using probiotic lactobacillus, acidophilus and Bifidobacterium strains (5).



NICOTINAMIDE ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE (NADH)


NADH is a coenzyme found in every cell of the body. It supports antiaging, converts food into energy, and maintains DNA integrity. All of these are important factors in disease prevention.


Given the enormous role NADH plays in energy production, it has been studied as a therapeutic for CFS. Study participants who received NADH had a dramatic reduction in CFS symptoms (6).


NADH can be bought as a supplement. Why not check out some of our online retailers?



ANTIOXIDANTS


Providing your body with the ingredients to fight free radicals is essential to reduce internal stress, fatigue and inflammatory levels.


Free radical damage (oxidative stress) is a key component of CFS, and research shows that antioxidant formulas are one of the best ways to reduce it.



Truehope's Olive Leaf Extract has an antioxidant power 4 x higher than Vitamin C. OLE is a powerhouse product that has tremendous health benefits outside of its positive effects on the digestive and cardiovascular systems. It has profound antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antiparasitic and antioxidant properties.


Learn more about OLE as an antioxidant in this VIDEO.


All the best,


Simon Brazier. Dip HN, NNCP

simon@truehope.com







REFERENCES

  1. https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/170315/dq170315c-eng.pdf

  2. CDC.gov, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, https://www.cdc.gov/me-cfs/about/index.html

  3. CDC.gov, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, https://www.cdc.gov/me-cfs/about/index.html

  4. Beneficial Microbes. 2018 Jun 15 ;9(4):603-611. Epub 2018 Apr 26. PMID: 29695180

  5. Nutrition Journal. 2009 Jan 26;8:4. PMID: 19171024

  6. P R Health Sci J. 2004 Jun;23(2):89-93. PMID: 15377055